• Ads

The Radio Electronics Magazine

Radio-Electronics was an American electronics magazine that was published under various titles from 1929 to 2003.You can Read them all here .

Radio Electronics Magazine at The Internet Archive

Recently i found a collection of those mags at Archive.org …..

Radio Electronics Magazine at Archive.org

Hugo Gernsback, sometimes called The Father of Science Fiction, started it as Radio-Craft in July 1929. The title was changed to Radio-Electronics in October 1948 and again to Electronics Now in July 1992. In January 2000 it was merged with Gernsback’s Popular Electronics to become Poptronics.

Gernsback Publications ceased operations in December 2002 and the January 2003 issue was the last.

Over the years, Radio-Electronics featured audio, radio, television and computer technology. The most notable articles were the TV Typewriter (September 1973)[1] and the Mark-8 computer (July 1974). These two issues are considered milestones in the home computer revolution.

Radio Electronics Magazine at SWTPC

Radio-Electronics was aimed at electronics’ professionals such as radio and TV repairmen. And they were men, the tag line on the cover was “For Men with Ideas in Electronics”.

Radio-Electronics & Electronics Now

Radio Electronics was the “new” name for Radio Craft magazine.. Hugo Gernsback, sometimes called The Father of Science Fiction, started it as Radio-Craft in July 1929. The title was changed to Radio-Electronics in October 1948. In July of 1992 transitioned to “Electronics Now

Nuts and Volts DIY Magazine

Online edition of US print magazine Nuts and Volts. Aimed at the electronics hobbyist, with articles covering amateur radio, cellular communications.

Nuts and Volts DIY Magazine

Nuts & Volts is written for the hands-on hobbyist, design engineer, technician, and experimenter. The diversity of subjects appeals to all levels of experience and spans such topics as amateur robotics, circuit design, lasers, computer control, home automation, microcontrollers, data acquisition, new technology, DIY projects, electronic theory, and more, not to mention the popular BASIC Stamp.

Adding More Digital I/O to your 16-Bit Experimenter Kit

16-Bit Experimenter Kit - Nuts and Volts

If you’ve been following the 16-Bit Micro Experimenter series in Nuts & Volts, you are already familiar with its solderless breadboard environment and the fully programmable 10 line I/O expansion bus that comes with the kit. The 10 lines can be assigned to be digital, analog or even connected to any of the PIC24F Microcontroller’s internal extensive peripheral set (i.e. dual UART, five CCP modules, ADC, Real time Clock Calendar, dual SPI, and dual I2C).

The Mini-Bench Supply

The Mini-Bench Supply

A small power supply with +5V, +12V, and -12V outputs is a handy thing to have around when you’re breadboarding circuits with both op-amps and digital ICs. You would want a switching regulator for efficiency, but linear regulators for low noise. Plus, it should be easy to build and relatively inexpensive.