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Raspberry Pi a teeny weeny Computer

Raspberry Pi is a Miniature Computer that can Interface with a Display Device like TV and a keyboard.

Raspberry Pi a teeny weeny Computer

Model A has been redesigned to have 256Mb RAM, one USB port and no Ethernet (network connection). Model B has 256Mb RAM, 2 USB port and an Ethernet port.

The Raspberry Pi measures 85.60mm x 53.98mm x 17mm, with a little overlap for the SD card and connectors which project over the edges. It weighs 45g.

Raspberry Pi a teeny weeny Computer

The SoC is a Broadcom BCM2835. This contains an ARM1176JZFS, with floating point, running at 700Mhz, and a Videocore 4 GPU. The GPU is capable of BluRay quality playback, using H.264 at 40MBits/s. It has a fast 3D core accessed using the supplied OpenGL ES2.0 and OpenVG libraries.
Overall real world performance is something like a 300MHz Pentium 2, only with much, much swankier graphics.

There is composite and HDMI out on the board, so you can hook it up to an old analogue TV, to a digital TV or to a DVI monitor. No VGA support.

Hobby Circuits – Bill Bowden

Bill Bowden’s Circuits is one of the oldest Web Reference, it was hosted by CompuServe homepages and later moved to his own domain website.

A small collection of electronic circuits for the hobbyist or student. Site includes over 100 circuit diagrams, links to related sites, commercial kits and projects, newsgroups and educational areas.

Hobby Circuits - Bill Bowden

Most of the circuits can be built with common components available from Radio Shack or salvaged from scrap electronic equipment…….

Hobby Circuits – Bill Bowden

Some of the Highlights in this website

  • 32.768 KHz Oscillator Using A Common Watch Crystal
  • 40 LED Bicycle Light (555 Timer – 6 volt)
  • Descrete LED fading circuit using 5 transistors
  • Mechanical Wall Clock Quartz Synchronizer
  • Neodymium Magnet Single Pole Motor
  • Variable Voltage and Current Power Supply
  • Micro Power AM Broadcast Transmitter

The Radio Electronics Magazine

Radio-Electronics was an American electronics magazine that was published under various titles from 1929 to 2003.You can Read them all here .

Radio Electronics Magazine at The Internet Archive

Recently i found a collection of those mags at Archive.org …..

Radio Electronics Magazine at Archive.org

Hugo Gernsback, sometimes called The Father of Science Fiction, started it as Radio-Craft in July 1929. The title was changed to Radio-Electronics in October 1948 and again to Electronics Now in July 1992. In January 2000 it was merged with Gernsback’s Popular Electronics to become Poptronics.

Gernsback Publications ceased operations in December 2002 and the January 2003 issue was the last.

Over the years, Radio-Electronics featured audio, radio, television and computer technology. The most notable articles were the TV Typewriter (September 1973)[1] and the Mark-8 computer (July 1974). These two issues are considered milestones in the home computer revolution.

Radio Electronics Magazine at SWTPC

Radio-Electronics was aimed at electronics’ professionals such as radio and TV repairmen. And they were men, the tag line on the cover was “For Men with Ideas in Electronics”.

Radio-Electronics & Electronics Now

Radio Electronics was the “new” name for Radio Craft magazine.. Hugo Gernsback, sometimes called The Father of Science Fiction, started it as Radio-Craft in July 1929. The title was changed to Radio-Electronics in October 1948. In July of 1992 transitioned to “Electronics Now

EMS Laboratories – Hobby Electronics

Unprecedented Innovations from a young group of Scientists who may change the way we interface with the Electronic Environment around us.

EMS Laboratories – Hobby Electronics

Meggy Jr RGB is designed to be programmed through the popular Arduino software environment, when you hook it up to your computer with an FTDI USB-TTL cable

Meggy Jr RGB

Meggy Jr RGB is a new kit that we designed as a platform to develop handheld pixel games. It’s based around a fully addressable 8×8 RGB LED matrix display, and features six big fat buttons for comfy game play.

A unique feature of Meggy Jr RGB is that it is designed to be mounted inside a “handle set” — a wooden or plastic case that’s safer and more pleasant to hold than a bare circuit board.